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Data Type Formats

This page describes the various formats supported for each data type. These are used when:

  • Supplying values when writing to a stream (see the “input” column).
  • Receiving values in query output (see the “output” column).

Wherever possible we aim to support both standard and commonly encountered formats for each data type.

Boolean

Boolean values can be supplied in terms of your data format’s native Boolean, Number, or String values.

Format Input Output
Boolean true true
Number All numbers are nonzero, like 1, 2, 3.489, ... true
String “true” true
String “t” true
String “yes” true
String “y” true

False will be considered all values are not covered as true, for instance: 0, "asdf, "false", "f", "n",...

Natural numbers

Natural number values can be supplied in terms of your data format’s native Number, or String values.

Format Input Output
Number 30 30
String “30” 30
Hexadecimal String “0x1E” 30
Binary String “0b00011110” 30

Real numbers

Real number values can be supplied in terms of your data format’s native Number, or String values.

Format Input Output
Number 1000.32 1000.32
String “1,000.32” 1000.32
String “1000.32” 1000.32
String ”.48E1” 4.8
Hexadecimal String “0x1E” 30
Binary String “0b00011110” 30

Date

Date values can be supplied in terms of your data format’s native Number, or String values.

When supplied as a String the following formats are valid - note that these are affected by your locale:

Format Input Output
Basic ISO “20090630” “2009-06-30”
ISO “2009-06-30” “2009-06-30”
ISO with time zone offset “2009-06-30+00:00” “2009-06-30”
ISO ordinal “2009-181” “2009-06-30”
ISO week date “2009-W27-2” “2009-06-30”
Short locale specific (US example) “6/30/09” “2009-06-30”
Medium locale specific (US example) “Jun 30, 2009” “2009-06-30”
Long locale specific (US example) “June 30, 2009” “2009-06-30”
Full locale specific (US example) “Tuesday, June 30, 2009” “2009-06-30”

When supplied as a Number the following formats are valid:

Format Input Output
Unix epoch milliseconds 1246363200000 “2009-06-30”
Unix epoch seconds 1246320000 “2009-06-30”
Microsoft CLR ticks 633819528000000000 “2009-06-30”

Time

Time values can be supplied in terms of your data format’s native Number, or String values.

When supplied as a String the following formats are valid - note that these are affected by your locale:

Format Input Output
ISO “07:03:47” “07:03:47”
ISO with fractional seconds “10:15:30.1” “10:15:30.1”
ISO with timezone offset “07:03:47+00:00” “07:03:47”
Short locale specific (US example) “7:03 AM” “7:03 AM”
Medium locale specific (US example) “7:03:47 AM” “7:03:47 AM”
Long locale specific (US example) “7:03:47 AM PDT” “7:03:47 AM PDT”
Full locale specific (US example) “7:03:47 AM PDT” “7:03:47 AM PDT”

When supplied as a Number the following formats are valid:

Format Input Output
Nanoseconds past midnight 25427000000000 “07:03:47”

Date time

Date time values can be supplied in terms of your data format’s native Number, or String values.

When supplied as a String the following formats are valid - note that these are affected by your locale:

Format Input Output
ISO “2011-12-03T10:15:30Z” (Z indicates UTC) “2011-12-03T10:15:30”
ISO with fractional seconds “2011-12-03T10:15:30.32Z” (Z indicates UTC) “2011-12-03T10:15:30.32”
ISO with offset “2011-12-03T10:15:30+01:00” “2011-12-03T10:15:30+01:00”
ISO with offset and zone “2011-12-03T10:15:30+01:00[Europe/Paris]” “2011-12-03T10:15:30+01:00[Europe/Paris]”
RFC 1123 “Tue, 3 Jun 2008 11:05:30 GMT” “Tue, 3 Jun 2008 11:05:30 GMT”
Short locale specific (US example) “6/30/09 7:03 AM” “6/30/09 7:03 AM”
Medium locale specific (US example) “Jun 30, 2009 7:03:47 AM” “Jun 30, 2009 7:03:47 AM”
Long locale specific (US example) “June 30, 2009 7:03:47 AM PDT” “June 30, 2009 7:03:47 AM PDT”
Full locale specific (US example) “Tuesday, June 30, 2009 7:03:47 AM PDT” “Tuesday, June 30, 2009 7:03:47 AM PDT”

When supplied as a Number the following formats are valid:

Format Input Output
Unix epoch milliseconds 1246345427000 “2009-06-30T07:03:47”
Unix epoch seconds 1246345427 “2009-06-30T07:03:47”
CLR ticks 633819422270000000 “2009-06-30T07:03:47”

Duration

Duration values must be supplied in terms of your data format’s native String value.

Duration values may be specified as ISO-8601 duration strings like so:

Input Output
“PT20.345S” “20.345 seconds”
“PT15M” “15 minutes”
“PT10H” “10 hours”
“P2D” “2 days”
“P2DT3H4M” “2 days, 3 hours and 4 minutes”
“P-6H3M” “-6 hours and +3 minutes”
“-P6H3M” “-6 hours and -3 minutes”
“-P-6H+3M” “+6 hours and -3 minutes”

Duration values may also be specified in a more human readable form like so:

Input Output
“1d 1h 1m 1s 1milli 1micro” “PT25H1M1.001001S”
“1micro” “PT0.000001S”
“1milli 1 micro” “PT0.001001S”
“1 second 1milli 1 micro” “PT1.001001S”
“1 minute 1 second 1milli 1 micro” “PT1M1.001001S”
“1 hour 1 minute 1 second 1milli 1 micro” “PT1H1M1.001001S”
“1 day 1 hour 1 minute 1 second 1milli 1 micro” “PT25H1M1.001001S”
“1 day 1 second 1 micro 1 nano” “PT24H1.000001001S”
“1d 1s 1micro 1nano” “PT24H1.000001001S”
“1m 1milli 1micro” “PT1M0.001001S”

UUID

UUID values must be supplied in terms of your data format’s native String value.

Valid formats are:

Format Input Output
String “188650eb-65f0-46b3-8f25-cc18a4a144b7” “188650eb-65f0-46b3-8f25-cc18a4a144b7”
String (no dash) “188650eb65f046b38f25cc18a4a144b7” “188650eb-65f0-46b3-8f25-cc18a4a144b7”
String (braces) “{188650eb-65f0-46b3-8f25-cc18a4a144b7}” “188650eb-65f0-46b3-8f25-cc18a4a144b7”
String (braces with no dash) “{188650eb65f046b38f25cc18a4a144b7}” “188650eb-65f0-46b3-8f25-cc18a4a144b7”

Internet Protocol (IP) address

IP address values must be supplied in terms of your data format’s native String value.

Both IPv4 http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc3330.txt and IPv6 http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2373.txt addresses are supported.

Note: IP addresses are only validated in terms of the format of the string (no reachability checks or DNS lookups are performed).

Valid formats are:

Input Output
“127.0.0.1” “127.0.0.1”
”::ffff:192.168.0.1” “192.168.0.1”
”::” “0:0:0:0:0:0:0:0”
“2001:db8:85a3::8a2e:370:7334” “2001:db8:85a3::8a2e:370:7334”
“2001:db8::1” “2001:db8:0:0:0:0:0:1”
“fe80::28:234a:4f21:8ece” “fe80:0:0:0:28:234a:4f21:8ece”

Email address

Email address values must be supplied in terms of your data format’s native String value.

A valid email is any string that contains the following pattern: AnyString@AnyString.

Note: email addresses are only validated in terms of the format of the string (no DNS lookups are performed).

URI

URI values must be supplied in terms of your data format’s native String value.

Valid formats are:

Input Output
http://valo.io http://valo.io
“/cluster/nodes” “/cluster/nodes”

Geo point

Geo point values must be supplied in terms of your data format’s native String value.

Valid formats are:

Input Output
“38.898648N, 77.037692W” A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“38.898648N 77.037692W” A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“N38.898648, W77.037692” A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“N38.898648 W77.037692” A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“-77.037692 38.898648” A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“38°53′55.1″N 77°02′15.7″W” A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“N38°53′55.1″ W77°02′15.7″” A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“38°53‘55.1”N 77°02‘15.7”W” A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“N38°53‘55.1” W77°02‘15.7”“ A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“38d53′55.1″N 77d02′15.7″W” A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“N38d53′55.1″ W77d02′15.7″” A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“38d53‘55.1”N 77d02‘15.7”W” A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“N38d53‘55.1” W77d02‘15.7”“ A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“38D53′55.1″N 77D02′15.7″W” A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“N38D53′55.1″ W77D02′15.7″” A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“38D53‘55.1”N 77D02‘15.7”W” A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“N38D53‘55.1” W77D02‘15.7”“ A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648
“N38d53m55.1s W77D02M15.7S” A point where x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648

Geohash values are also supported.

Geo circle

Geo circle values must be supplied in terms of your data format’s native String value.

Geographic circles are represented as the centre coordinate specified using the same valid formats as Geo point and the radius.

Here is an example using the first Geo point format.

Input Output
“38.898648N, 77.037692W 10.0” A circle where the points are x=-77.037692 and y=38.898648 with a distance=0.1° 10.00km (based on Earth)

Geo rectangle

Geo rectangle values must be supplied in terms of your data format’s native String value.

Geo rectangles are represented as a pair of diagonally opposite lat / lon coordinates, with each coordinate specified using the same valid formats as Geo point.

Here is an example using the first Geo point format.

Input Output
“28.898648N, 77.037692W 38.898648N, 67.037692W” A rectangle where minX=-77.037692, maxX=-67.037692, minY=28.898648 and maxY=38.898648